Category: Bank of Japan

Fred Hickey compares today’s central banks to 19th century patent medicine factories

Fred Hickey, editor of The High-Tech Strategist ($150/year, thehightechstrategist@yahoo.com), grew up in Lowell, Massachusetts, known as the “Birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution.”  In his latest HTS he discusses the genesis of the patent medicine industry in his hometown during the mid-1800s:

For a time, Lowell became America’s largest industrial center…  In addition to the textile factories, other industries grew up in the city around the same time, including patent medicine factories – Father John’s Medicine and J.C. Ayer & Co. among them.

Dr. J.C. Ayer founded J.C. Ayer & Co. in Lowell and his factory became one of the largest of its kind in the world.  Advertising was the key to success…, with the company distributing millions of copies of its free “almanac” (propaganda) annually around the world – in eight languages, including Chinese.  A sample from the almanac:

“The skillful pilot steers his ship through all dangers and guides her safely to port.  So the skillful physician pilots his patient through the perils of sickness to perfect health.  In cases of General Debility, so common at present day, he recommends the use of Ayer’s Sarsaparilla, because of its superior efficacy in aiding the formation of pure and vigorous blood, thereby restoring the normal condition to every fibre, organ, nerve, and muscle of the body.  It cures others and will cure you.  This standard remedy is compounded of the best tonics and alternatives known to science, and its superior qualities as blood-purifier and invigorator have stood the test of nearly half a century.”

Ayer became fabulously wealthy, amassing a fortune of some $20 million – quite a sum for the time.

Though Dr. Ayer never practiced medicine, the cover of each J.C. Ayer almanac was decorated with classical engravings such as one showing the Greek physician Hippocrates standing atop the earth declaring: “Heal the sick.”  What was not to believe with such evidence coming from a great doctor?

Hickey goes on the draw the parallel to central banking:

 Today, we look back and laugh – how could these people be so gullible?  Yet, the world is currently under the spell of its own modern-day quacks – known as central bankers.  Central bankers are touted as having the cure for all of our financial problems.  Their tonic, with the scientifically-sounding name of “quantitative easing,” or QE for short, is guaranteed to restore our financial health, to cleanse us from all our ills.  Whether the cause is spending beyond our means (perennial trillion dollar deficits and gigantic debts), making entitlement promises we cannot keep, building a gigantic welfare state of dependents, having a dysfunctional (and sometimes corrupt) government, constructing a byzantine tax system, tying up our businesses in a web of regulations, enabling “too-big-to-fail” banks to grow monstrously bigger – all can be cured with the magical elixir called QE.

Our skillful physician pilots (brandishing their doctorates from Princeton and M.I.T.) have discovered a miracle cure to be sure – at least that’s what one hears all day long from the talking heads on CNBC…  The media dissects Bernanke’s every utterance for clues as to whether he will supply more of the miracle or not.  The cameras are always on – even when he’s just laying out lame jokes at a Princeton commencement ceremony.

The QE medicine is seductive and addictive…

The best part yet – the QE medicine that he and other central bankers around the world are ladling out tastes so good… With QE, stocks will never fall on Tuesdays (20 straight up Tuesdays in a row), stock markets will never again have a 5% “correction,” (nearing 200 days without a 5% decline), investors can lever up with margin debt to record levels ($384 billion and counting – exceeding the 2007 pre-crash level)…  Investors have become so addicted to the QE wonder drug than even the merest hint of a lower dosage (tapering) sends up cries of anguish from the financial world.  Stock prices wobble; interest rates soar and CNBC anchors throw hissy-fits.

Other than the hallucinogenic effects, is the drug working?

Despite an additional $6 trillion of deficit spending, 0% interest rates and trillions of dollars of newly-created high-powered monetary reserves by the Federal Reserve (QE) that has driven asset inflation sharply higher (stocks, bonds, farmland, art and gold); over the past 4+ years we have experienced the slowest economic recovery in post-war history…  Last month investors celebrated a pathetic 165,000 jobs created, when 278,000 of those jobs were part-time.  In other words, we lost another 113,000 full-time jobs.  The U-6 unemployment rate (including part-time workers unable to find full-time work) ticked UP to 13.9%… With jobs hard to get and real inflation-adjusted incomes falling, the average American consumer is under pressure.  Witness the fairly miserable first quarter sales results from America’s largest retailers reported last month.  Same-store sales fell year-over-year at Wal-Mart, Target, Kohl’s and Sears…  Yesterday we received the Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) report for May which, at a reading of 49.0, showed the biggest contraction in American manufacturing activity in four years – since the “Great Recession” of 2009…  I’ve been going through scores of first quarter earnings reports and conference calls from the largest technology companies.  The numbers and commentary were consistently gloomy – it was the worst batch of results I’ve seen since the end of the Great Recession.

At this stage of recovery something is terribly wrong.  Let me clue you in on a little secret – money printing doesn’t work.

The Japanese chugged plenty of this medicine…

Japan was the first to try “QE” to resolve its problems (though it was certainly not the first to try money printing).  They’ve been attempting to lift their economy out of a decades-long recession for many years.  The Bank of Japan (BOJ) tripled its balance sheet but did nothing to address the real underlying causes of the disease.  They did not address their lifetime employment system that hobbles business flexibility.  They did little to correct the ridiculous rules and regulations that suffocate the agricultural, medical and retail industries.  They raised taxes.  They massively increased government spending, wasting trillions of dollars and causing a debt pileup (235% of GDP and still rising) – the likes of which the world has never seen from a developed country.  As one would expect, the attempt failed spectacularly.

Yet the American snake oil salesmen claimed they didn’t drink enough!

Dr. Bernanke, and other high priests of central planning (including Paul Krugman) lectured the Japanese that their problem was they weren’t swilling enough of the QE tonic fast enough.  For a decade the BOJ resisted, always citing concerns over inflation.  Finally, Shinzo Abe was swept into power on the campaign promise of more licorice for everyone! After eliminating the key inflation-phobes (Masaaki Shirakawa) from the BOJ and replacing them with Bernanke-like clones (Haruhiko Kuroda), the new era of “Abenomics” was on…  The BOJ announced a plan to double its monetary base (high-powered money) within two years.  In other words, they opted to chug the whole bottle of medicine at once.

After discussing the post-WWI German experiment in money printing gone awry (Weimar hyperinflation), Hickey sees the American experiment ending badly:

Despite this horrific central banker record, U.S. investors still want to believe that Father Ben’s QE medicine will eventually work.  But just because the crowd believes this fantasy, doesn’t mean I have to.  As long as the Fed continues to print tens of billions of dollars a month, stocks can continue to climb higher, but the gap between the economic reality (poor) and the stock valuations (euphoric) widens to ever more dangerous levels.  Another crash is coming and I intend to avoid it – once again.

In conclusion, Fred Hickey offers an antidote to the QE drug:

Throughout history, the antidote to money debasement has always been gold.

Japanese government bonds take biggest 2-day hit in 5 years

As Tyler Durden of Zero Hedge reported, 10-year JGBs took their worst 2-day plunge since the financial meltdown of Q4, 2008:

The last 2 days have seen JGB prices plunge at the fastest rate since the post-Lehman debacles in Sept/Oct 2008 smashing back to 13 month highs.  5Y yields are surging even more – trading above 34bps now (up from 9.9bps on March 5th). These are simply astronomical moves in the context of JGB history and strongly suggest Abe & Kuroda are anything but in control of the quadrillion Yen domestic bond market as they jawbone inflation expectations into the psychology of the people.

Meanwhile, the Japanese yen has fallen off a cliff as the Bank of Japan (BoJ) opens the monetary floodgates:

Jeff Berwick, editor of The Dollar Vigilante Blog weighs in on the bond vigilantes calling the BoJ’s bluff:

Traders should take note of Japanese Government Bond prices.  On April 4th the Bank of Japan made the announcement that they intended to DOUBLE the money supply and buy government bonds roughly equaling $80B a month.  Does this number sound familiar?  It should since the US Federal Reserve’s own quantitative easing program is roughly $85 B a month.  An important data point to remember here is that the Japanese economy is only 1/3 the size of the US economy, but its own quantitative easing program equals that of the US.   To say Japan is “doubling down” on the same failed policy approach it has taken for the last 20 years would be a bit of a misnomer.  This is Japan’s “all in” move as I try to keep the gambling metaphor rolling.  A gamble is exactly what this is, a very big gamble with no precedent in economic history.

What are the consequences of rapidly increasing government spending, monetizing $80B a month in debt, and flooding the market with yen?  It is hard to miss the headlines as the Yen on the futures exchange is now trading at below 100 yen to the USD for the first time in four years.

Berwick offers an explanation as to why bondholders are beginning to act more rationally:

Why are bonds trading lower?  Think about this from a prudent lender’s point of view and you will have your answer.  If I give you yen, and you give me a security (bond) that says you will give me back my yen with interest in 10 years, then why would I sit with that security and let you pay me back with a devalued currency?  Well, in Japan bondholders appear to be speaking with their market participation.  Bond holders are doing exactly what they should be doing.  Bond holders should be liquidating bonds and converting money out of yen into non-yen denominated securities and investments (note all the M&A activity from Japanese companies in the last seven months as the smart money runs and not walks out of Japan and the yen).

How can the savers in Japan be sitting idly by and watching the purchasing power of their savings being destroyed?  We are on the first chapter of a very ugly time in Japan where policy makers decisions will strain the very social fabric of the country.  We will have a front row seat to the failings of the Keynesian economic philosophy.  It will not be pretty for Japan. And it could very well be the first major event in The End Of The Monetary System As We Know It.

Last Friday, in his Daily Rap, Bill Fleckenstein mentioned the possibility of a Japanese canary in the sovereign debt coal mine:

Japan was the epicenter of fireworks that spread around the world, as last night their equity market rallied 3% even as their debt market had a bit of a nasty spill. However, it must be kept in perspective that the change was rather small and rates have only backed up to where they were in February. So it is not exactly huge trouble, but it could be the start of a shift. At the moment, the bond and currency markets are declining in Japan. Should that continue and should the bond market worsen materially, it would be an early sign of what an eventual funding crisis would look like.

Of course, as long as Japan’s central bank is buying such huge amounts of paper it can thwart that for a time, but it could be the first sign of a bond market anywhere revolting against the printing press. As I say, it is very early days and I don’t want to make too much of it, but a trickle can eventually become a flood, and a trickle has to start somewhere.

Over three weeks ago, in our Q1 letter to investors, we mentioned the possibility of a “Wizard of Oz moment” as the BoJ accelerated its monetary experiment:

Two weeks ago, the Bank of Japan announced a doubling of its asset purchase program.  In Pavlovian response, speculators bid up Japanese government bonds strongly, with the 10-year yielding just under 0.40%.  The following day those gains completely evaporated.  Had the BoJ lost control and the market called its bluff?

For now Goldilocks prevails, but for how long?  Fleckenstein considers the glaring (and widening) disconnects:

So we continue to be in the most perverse sweet spot in the history of the money-printing era that began over 20 years ago. Between the BOJ and the Fed, we are printing about $1.8 trillion a year, along with massive deficit spending, and those policies are regarded as a panacea for equities and just fine for bonds, but horrible for assets that protect one against inflation. Of course, that makes no sense, but when you are in a warped environment (and this is the most warped ever), crazy things not only happen, they lead to even crazier outcomes until the madness finally stops, after which all hell breaks loose.

So much for the notion that central bankers are in control.  Did the global reach-for-yield bubble just go “pop”?

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